Simone Uncensored

July 24, 2017

Leadership…Diversity…Intersectionality…

I’ve told you before about Mike EdwardsTransformation newsletter.

I suppose you can call this social commentary. But I prefer to think of this as leadership…. building community…. respecting differences…. recognizing the intersectionality of so very many issues….

So here’s a great article from Transformation Newsletter…where love meets social justice…

Surely this is leadership. Just as are these quotations from my own quote collection….

  • “We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormenter, never the tormented.” (Eli Weisel)
  • “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.” (Desmond Tutu)
  • “Sometimes to be Silent is to Lie.” (Miguel Unamuno, Spanish philosopher, about the Spanish Civil War. Zinn quotes this about the Vietnam war)
  • “Creating social change is exciting. It’s proof that we are alive and thinking. What could be better than to work for a future where fairness is the bottom line?” (Alfre Woodward, Robin Hood Was Right)
July 17, 2017

Order or convincing

From Tom Ahern:

I (Tom) was attempting to teach the Domain Formula for lucrative print donor newsletters. And a fundraiser asked “How do I convince marcomms to shrink our existing newsletter from 8 pages to 4 pages?”

Tom’s response: “IN TRUTH – This is a work order, not a persuasion exercise.”

Yes. The knowledgeable fundraiser directs marcomms.

Too often, fundraisers are in the position of trying to “persuade” the boss or board or board member … or marketing/communications … to do the right thing.

YES! THE RIGHT THING! The thing based on research. Like scientific research! The thing that has demonstrated success over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and ….

Sometimes these fundraisers are:

  • Scared and can’t risk losing their jobs. That’s understandable. Find another job where they respect you and your knowledge.
  • Don’t actually know the body of knowledge. Don’t follow research. Don’t embrace continuous learning. Shame on you. Learn the right stuff or go away and let true fundraisers push the right stuff.
  • Regularly explain to the boss, board, board members, and marc/com … and continually lose to these annoyingly silly (even dumb, perhaps) people who don’t listen to the research and body of knowledge you keep explaining. Why don’t they listen? Because they’re arrogant? Believe personal opinion trumps research and and … I don’t know. You probably don’t know either. But if you’ve tried and tried and tried and tried… Then find another job where you will receive the respect you deserve.

This is difficult work. I know. But don’t confuse your role. You are (should be) the expert. Explain. Then direct. Or find another job. You deserve so much better than this ignorant dynamic.

July 11, 2017

Conversations your NGO should have

I usually avoid the word “should.” Who am I to tell you what you “should” do?

On the other hand…There’s leadership. And building a strong society.

I do believe that there are issues that all sectors (government. for-profit. nonprofit) should (yes should) talk about…

And the GENDER GAP is one of the shoulds.

Gender Gap in salary. (Recommend some articles or blogs and I’ll post them.) Gender Gap in public office. (Articles you particularly appreciate? How about books?) Gender Gap on boards and in the C Suite.

So here’s an interesting infographic, “Which States Have the Smallest Gender Gap in Occupations?” And why does that even matter? (Lots of very insightful reasons!)

I’ll bet lots of you know what STEM is…Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics… Traditionally male-dominated fields. But there’s been great work over the past years to change this.

  • But do you know why STEM careers are so popular:
  • Higher wages (high wage-to-education ratio)
  • Reducing debt allows faster saving and earlier retirement
  • Having a broder impact, e.g., improving areas of life for many others worldwide (and this is a strong motivator for most women.)

The good news: The gender gap between men to women is starting to close as the benefits of a STEM career become more apparent. Check out the article and infographic. Thank you, Hazel Garcia.

 

Filed under: Leadership, Research

July 6, 2017

Leadership. Risk. Commitment. COURAGE!

The speech of Major Mitch Landrieu displays leadership. Courage. Risk.

And eloquence.

The eloquence of story telling. The guts to lead and take action. The care and respect to help others understand.

The guts to do the “right thing.” Because there are right things to do (and hence wrong things, too). There are right things in your NGO…in life…in community…in speaking out despite any risk.

That’s leadership and commitment.

Filed under: Leadership

June 19, 2017

The Indivisible Movement

SOLIDARITY… What is it?

A labor union in Poland. Independent of government and the Polish Communist Party. Membership grew to several million in the early 1980s.

Unity or agreement of feeling or action. Mutual support.

And how about this new solidarity movement?

Visit the Indivisible Movement. Maybe some of us want to join?

Check out The Guide (which caused Google Docs to crash!!) Click here for the summary.

Filed under: Social Commentary

June 14, 2017

Learning together

I know you’ve been to lots of conferences. But the September 2017 tour with Mallabone, Ross, Ahern, Joyaux is different. I’ve done this kind of tour with Guy Mallabone before. We each have 1.5 hours and we integrate the topics and we do a 4-way conversation at the endIntimate. Presenters who know each other and can comment back and forth with each other and you, too!

Register here.

Filed under: Resources

June 12, 2017

Amazing thank-you letter

Another amazing letter from Ashley, Executive Revolutionary from RIUDL.

Sounds real. Like Ashley actually wrote it.

Hand-written note at the top on the front page. Yes! It’s a 2-page thanks letter. Can you imagine?

Tells a story about Genesis, 11 years old when she arrived in Rhode Island USA.

Later in the letter, in bold: Your gift of $2,500 on 3/1/2017 is helping create more stories like this.

Next sentence: In a single year your generosity allowed us to go from reaching just over 100 to well over 1,000 students. No joke.

And check out this P.S. “This letter doubles as a tax receipt and a pick-me-up. Becuase of you, young people like Genesis are that much closer to becoming policy makers. And I have doubt they will wield that power to do amazing things. Thank you for setting them up for success. Onward and upward!”

WOW.

 

June 5, 2017

Cultures of….

Guru Peter Drucker commented that “organizational culture eats strategy for breakfast.” (Or it might have been lunch!)

Organizational culture is about the personality of the organization. The way things work. The unwritten rules and and … Check it out at Wikipedia. Read articles at www.hbr.org.

Within a good organizational culture, we want a culture of philanthropy. So what’s that? Visit the article on my website. Check out Advancing Philanthropy‘s entire issue devoted to philanthropic culture.

Okay. But what about other cultures? Culture of resiliency. Culture of performance. Culture of inclusion. Have you found any articles or resources about these elements of organizational culture? Please let me know. I’m going to do some writing, I think.

May 15, 2017

Past. Today. Future. We weren’t smart. We aren’t. And will we be?

Sometimes Seth Godin makes me cheer and laugh or dance around the room in anger.

Sometimes he makes me want to cry. Wanting to cry now when I re-read this blog: “Who Cut Down the Last Tree?” On Easter Island, they cut down all the trees (for fire, homes, etc.) And eventually the people all died. Extinction. Read Jared Diamond’s story of Easter Island. And I’ve ordered Diamond’s book Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed.

Seth isn’t focused on the last tree. He focuses on the next-to-the-last tree. And he asks the age-old question: Where was everyone? Was anyone watching the destruction of something important. Was anyone worried about what this said about the people who cut down the next-to-the-last tree? Was anyone in the society bothered or questionning or demonstrating or speaking out or fighting or?

Yes. This blog was trending back when it was first posted in April. But I like to talk about things later. When I’m afraid people might have already forgotten.

Seth talks about culture in the blog. I talk about organizational culture regularly. And as Peter Drucker once said: “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” (Or was it lunch? Who cares which meal!)

Where is everyone? That’s my question. People in society stopping the next-to-the-last tree in our society. (Tom always tells me I’m too pessimistic. That so much has changed and is better. Yes, sure. But it’s also awful and getting worse. And actually, Tom is feeling pretty bad these days.)

Fundraisers and CEOs  and board members and…stopping the next-to-the-last trees in their organizations … from mission to governance to fundraising to organizational culture. Whatever. Self-destructive through ignorance, energy, evidence-based fact, whatever…

Okay. Enough.

Filed under: Leadership

May 12, 2017

SOCIAL COMMENTARY. Watch out. Avoid.

Friend and colleague Sheena Greer sent me a review of Ivanka Trump’s new book, Women Who Work. London journalist/writer/critic Laurie Penny wrote the review. Our Lady of Complicity

This is more than a scathing book review of Ivanka and Trumpism and and … This is actually a very important analysis of what she is promoting for society.

Ms. Penny has analyzed the language and the metaphors and the statements and … and everything.

It’s terrifying. The book is a terrifying description of how women should behave. A hugely very scary narrative about how our society should operate.

I’m more than angry. I’m so deeply sad that anyone could believe this. Agree with this. I’m so very very scared for women and girls. And for men and boys.

And my sadness and fear are pretty safe and secure…. because I’m a white, heterosexual, well-educated, affluent person. Yes, by being a woman, I’m at risk. But since I was born white and heteorsexual… and my mom and dad could afford to pay for my college education… I’m safer than so many others. My unearned privilege — my born with privilege — self, is more safe and more winning and and and … And I think that sucks. And it’s (relatively) safe for me to speak out. (Despite periodic criticism that I shouldn’t talk that way.)

I’m so sad and scared for our society. For girls and women and boys and men. And….

Filed under: Social Commentary

Simone Joyaux, ACFRE, Adv Dip, is an internationally recognized expert in fund development, board and organizational development, strategic planning, and management.

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