Leadership

January 22, 2018

BMW (& not the car!) Cool blog from Marc Pitman

If not the car, what is BMW? Bitch. Moan. Whine. ! ! ! ! ! ! !

YES! I so believe in BMW…NOT the car kind!

I just love this KICK from Marc, the Fundraising Coach.

Several excerpts to entice you to read the whole darn Kicker blog…

For the next 10 minutes, all you’re allowed to do is bitch, moan, and whine. (Imagine, permission to do that. Hey, Tom Ahern, give me permission. Oh, that’s right…I just take permission and he rolls his eyes…albeit graciously!)

I set the timer and started yelling at God….I went on and on. It felt kind of risky. Was a BMW session a legitimate form of prayer? Was I allowed to talk this way?

But at the same time it felt really good. I went on as long as I could and then a bit longer. When I strated repeating myself, I looked at the timer. I still had four minutes left.

The crazy thinig? If I hadn’t done a BMW session, I would’ve spent my entire car 45-minute drive stewing in negativity.

For more, check out Marc’s “Fundrdaising Kick: A weekly coaching email for nonprofit fundraising.”

January 15, 2018

Good stuff to read & learn & fun maybe, too?

Thanks to all the cool people who send me cool stuff. Cause there’s lots of cool stuff out there!

So check these cool-nesses…

3 incredibly important emerging issues. For me, these are next level issues that don’t get discussed enough, if at all,” says Canadian collegue Deborah Coult. And Deborah says  watch this “amazing video.

  • Spend down vs. perpetuity
  • Justice versus need
  • Tax implications

And from Connecticut colleague Maxine Bleiweis: Skipp Richard, Leadership Insights.

December 18, 2017

No way out…Seth Godin and Simone Joyaux

Have you read Seth’s marvelous blog “No way Out?” 

Sometimes it’s easier to just leave or quit… or not engage in the first place. For the military, “no way out” refers to something that’s a huge gamble. Because big gambles mean there’s no way out. So we burn the boats and stay till we fail or succeed. But failure is, I suspect,  more likely.

On the other hand, risk isn’t as bad as gamble. And calculated risks are actually usually pretty smart. In fact, sometimes the bigger risk – the ultimate dumb gamble – is not taking any risk.

Seth comments that the best approach could be learning something, toughing it out, engaging with the challenge. Because if you actually get through, “…you’ll be different. Better.”

Seth reminds us that “we always have a choice, but often, it’s a good idea to act as if we don’t.” Burn the boats. Take the gamble. Go for it.

And in my document “Planning for any future that could come along,” here’s what I write: Differentiating between risk and gamble…

  • How do you create a shared understanding of risk and gamble within your nonprofit?
  • What criteria can your nonprofit use to differentiate between risk and gamble?
  • What is a good process to effectively manage risk and avoid a gamble?
  • How does an organization identify the stop-loss moment?
December 13, 2017

VERY VERY IMPORTANT! PLEASE CHECK THIS OUT!!!!!!!!!!!

NOT A fundraising request. NOT an emergency.

BUT… You doing this could help our profession and you and others and and…..

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PARTICIPATE IN THIS SURVEY about ETHICS!!! ………….. How do YOU make ethical decisions? …………………

A doctoral student at the Hartsook Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy (U.K.) is conducting this research. The Hartsook Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy is led by Adrian Sargeant and Jen Shang. This center leads academic research in FUNDRAISING. Fundraising…the work that you and I damn well better do better at doing!!!

Bad news: Will take approximately 30 minutes of your time. I know that’s lots of time. But maybe drink a glass of wine while you do the survey? Or eat caramels,  like I do.

PLEASE PLEASE… Your participation makes a difference. YOU can help advance the profession. (And by the way…. exclusive offer…. You’ll get your own scores to learn more about how and why you make decisions.)

DIRECTIONS DIRECTIONS DIRECTIONS FOR THE SURVEY

  • The survey must be completed at a computer with a keyboard (i.e. desktop, laptop). There is a section of the survey which is not compatible with mobile devices. Your participation will be anonymous, and to appreciate your time, you will have the option to receive your personal scores and enter a draw (for an iPad mini or £100 of gift vouchers).
  • If you would like to participate, please follow this link when you have 30 minutes to dedicate to the survey (or copy and paste this text into your browser:https://plymouthbusiness.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_beFvHemJrOaoPkh

Please consider forwarding this invitation to your fellow fundraising colleagues as well. The results will help answer relevant questions and strengthen fundraising for years to come.

 

 

November 29, 2017

Do you know who David Suzuki is?

I didn’t. Check him out here

But then I heard him at AFP Toronto Congress….. Amazing environmentalist. Amazingly articulate about living and feeling. NOT the typical environmentalist academic data and stuff.

He made me think – simultaneously – more broadly and more narrowly. He put words to my feelings. Or rather, he made me understand my feelings and my unease better.

  • Humankind is an incredible predator for the planet…
  • Moving from an agrarian society to an urban society…and the economy became the priority. With the economy as the priority, we’re committing suicide. Extreme statement? Not when you listen to Suzuki. We’re in a mega period of extinction. Destroying species – like insects – that play a mjor role in the earth’s sustainability, including feeding us humans!
  • Suzuki critics the “triple bottom line” … People. Planet. Profit. Because the profit thing (economy) always dominates. For example, trees have no value until they’re cut. But cut down the forest and there’s no more photosynthesis, managing species, etc. Unfortunately, all that stuff is irrelevant to the economy.
  • The laws of nature, e.g., the laws of physics, chemistry, etc. We are shaped and constained by the laws of nature. But we ignore them.

Suzuki notes that we’re creating the illusion that all is okay. But it isn’t.

Earth. Air. Water. Fire.

Filed under: Leadership

November 20, 2017

Memories of IFC 2017

Thanks to the Resource Alliance, UK for the marvelous IFC 2017 (International Fundraising Congress). 

Truly international – and risk-taking.

Imagine talking with colleagues all over the world... And you can always find and connect with people in the dining rooms reserved for IFC participants. Just sit anywhere… Perhaps you’ll be talking with Chinese and South African colleagues. Fundraisers and executives from Nigeria, Argentina, Slovakia, Thailand, Singapore, Canada, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, France, Autralia, Turkey, Jordan, Pakistan, Czech Republic, Germany…. And more….

Here are some wonderful highlights… To inspire and challenge you and me over and over…

Ahmen…Fundraiser and rapper…This is my favorite plenary session. Beautiful. Angry. Hopeful. Speaking out. Challenging us.

I did a 6-hour masterclass called “Changing Your Organization for Greater Impact.” Here’s my video promo for the masterclass. (People came up to me at the conference — whom I didn’t know — saying that they liked my ad.)

Have you ever seen live graphic documenting during meetings or presentations? It’s marvelous. And the IFC has this happening… First in 2016, I think. And again in 2017. And I hope forever!!!

This is the graphic facilitation (by Housatonic) for my masterclass. You can see many more IFC drawings on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

Filed under: Leadership, Research, Resources

November 14, 2017

What are we white people doing?

Marvelous piece about white people power. The article is called “America is Burning.” It’s directed to white people working in philanthropy. And the article asks us, “what is your next move?”

And check out this wonderful interview by Bill Moyer, “Peeling the Whitewash from our Myths.” Moyer is interviewing Susan K. Smith, researcher in American history, religion, and culture.

What are we white people doing? Why don’t we understand? So many years. So many deaths. So many laws and demonstrations. Yes, of course, some change. But not enough. I hope athletes – both black and white – will take the knee on every field and court possible. I hope that protests abound, whites marching in partnership with all people of color.

I watch people twitch when I talk about my unearned privilege of being white, heterosexual, well-educated and affluent.  And my disadvantage is being female. I have people hug me because I talk candidly. And others criticize me because I shouldn’t talk about this stuff.

I think everyone should talk about “this stuff.” I think philanthropic organizations should talk about “this stuff” lots and lots.

November 9, 2017

Reflections from the past – and still happening somehow today

Slavery did NOT end in 1865…

And please don’t tell me that “it’s so very very very much better now.”

So very very very much better? OVER?  NO! Not over! How about the still-alive-today Ku Klux Klan?

Yes, better in some ways. No more lynchings.         But still lots of killing. STILL!   And more imprisonment and …

Visit the National Museum of African-American History and Culture. Such sadness and pain and so much truth to hear and learn and embrace. Truth.                Have you read the Emancipation Proclamation? 

Are you familiar with Jim Crow laws and the 1896 Supreme Court decision Plessy versus Ferguson?

How long did it take to overturn Plessy v. Ferguson? Until 1954. Brown versus Board of Education. And here’s the timeline.

Did you and I think that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 fixed everything? How about the Voting Rights Act of 1965? One of the most beautiful stories for President Obama’s first inauguration: “Wish you were here.” Thank you Bob Herbert.

Do you know about the Southern Strategy – building a new majority based on antipathy towards the Civil Rights movement and the work of Lyndon Baines Johnson?

What have we done? What are we still doing?

Just read the news. Listen to the stories. Look in someone’s eye. Think in your mind and heart.

And watch this YouTube video. What will you do differently? Will you speak out? Will you and I learn more and speak more loudly? If not you and me, who? If not now, when?

 

November 4, 2017

Stories from my dorm room

Ah Cohort 27 (and your two Cohort 26 colleagues)….. You’ve been so fantastic in Emerging Issues for SMUMN’s Philanthropy and Development Program.

Hey out there in the world…What kind of emerging issues have you been observing, do you anticipate might become trends… (And absolutely do NOT NOT NOT say anything about Millennials or social media. I mean really…. Emerging? Not hardly!! Emerged. Past emerged. Life.)

So what were those 12 marvelous colleagues in PHDE 657 Emerging Issues writing about?

Things like:

  • Can we really afford to close our borders?
  • Building a new era of trust
  • Girls in the Boy Scouts
  • Trauma informed and feedback movement in the social sector
  • Change coming in our diocese – or can we be agents of change?
  • Apocalypse Soon: The need for standards
  • Valuable recruits are following emerging issues
  • Fundraising for the New NCAA (No one Can Abuse Athletes)
  • Emerging into my new
  • Instability and uncertainty in the development director role
  • Throwing away the rubber stamp: a board self-assessment to drive growth

And how about that NCAA thing? That’s collegiate sports for those of you not into sports (like me)!!! And how about taking the knee in NFL games? So we had all this great wonderful back and forth in the online classroom, talking about race and racism and athletes. So very very cool!!

And the author of the final project for the “new NCAA” emailed me with the new Sports Illustrated cover.  His email to me said, “This month’s cover of Sports Illustrated… The NCAA is Broken (but you knew that). Interesting stuff and sad the exploitation of young African American athletes.”

 

 

October 23, 2017

Please help: Survey about leadership…yours, mine, & others!

Please join me and take this leadership survey. Takes only 14 minutes to complete. https://plymouthbusiness.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2aFGGX21xXzr3fL

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Hail all leaders… CEOs, directors of development, team leaders, COOs. How do you behave? What’s your management style? How does this style make you a successful leader?

Would you like to be a better leader – more successful? I would. So I plan to participate in this survey.

Please help research the relationship between leadership styles you and others use … And how each style might produce good outcomes, such as a thriving culture of philanthropy.

Here’s the survey link. I’m hoping you’ll participate. https://plymouthbusiness.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2aFGGX21xXzr3fL

 Who’s doing this research? People I really admire and respect.

  • The very trustworthy Hartsook Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy (founded by Adrian Sargeant with Jen Shang as the research director).
  • Marc Pitman (CEO of The Concord Leadership Group. I think of him as bowtie guy.)

Filed under: Leadership, Research

Simone Joyaux, ACFRE, Adv Dip, is an internationally recognized expert in fund development, board and organizational development, strategic planning, and management.

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